LoginCreate an account

     
 
Home News-Telegram News Audit indicates HCSO’s training records on target

Audit indicates HCSO’s training records on target

E-mail Print PDF

Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officer Standards and Education agents gave Hopkins County Sheriff’s Office top marks during their regular evaluation of the department’s training records.

TCLEOSE not only found the department’s records for its officers training programs to be in compliance, but it did so in record time. The annual audit of training records for all department personnel and programs generally takes two to three hours, but thanks to the department’s well-kept records the evaluation took less than an hour, noted Lt. Henry Turner, who recently attended training sessions to oversee the department’s training program.

“They look at all our records to make sure we have adequate training and are compliant with rules and regulations,” Turner said. “They check everything — pretest, post test, tests. They have to evaluate records of all master tests on file, have curriculum and objectives on file. I have to fill out a survey each year. There’s just so much stuff — the classes taken, videos and computers, everything.”

Not only does the state evaluation see if records are kept, but the audit ensures that the training complies with TCLEOSE and other requirements; that each officer has met all continuing education and training requirements; checks for curriculum for courses offered  and lesson plans, evaluation and records for each; looks at required quarterly reports and the minutes that have to be kept for a training advisory board, which has to meet certain requirements, be apprised of law and regulation changes, as well as program changes; and have copies of past TCLEOSE training evaluations for five years.

Each department is evaluated on a yes-or-no, pass/fail standard on a check list that spans more than three pages.

“Everything on the check list has to be in order,” said Turner. “It was a lot to learn. This was my first time to do it.”

Turner this year took over the program following the resignation of the former training coordinator, Andy Chester, who accepted a position in another county. Turner has been to several instructor training and training coordinator conferences to make sure he was up-to-date on new and updated training areas. He’ll go in October to another week-long training coordinator’s conference.

He credits the department’s good marks on last week’s training records audit largely to the former coordinator, Andy Chester.

“He could have left things in a shambles, but when I took it over there wasn’t a whole lot to overhaul – just go through an make sure everything is in compliance with the [training records] book [the department is required to maintain]. Andy left it in good shape,” Turner said of Chester.Audit indicates HCSO’s training records on target Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officer Standards and Education agents gave Hopkins County Sheriff’s Office top marks during their regular evaluation of the department’s training records.

TCLEOSE not only found the department’s records for its officers training programs to be in compliance, but it did so in record time. The annual audit of training records for all department personnel and programs generally takes two to three hours, but thanks to the department’s well-kept records the evaluation took less than an hour, noted Lt. Henry Turner, who recently attended training sessions to oversee the department’s training program.

“They look at all our records to make sure we have adequate training and are compliant with rules and regulations,” Turner said. “They check everything — pretest, post test, tests. They have to evaluate records of all master tests on file, have curriculum and objectives on file. I have to fill out a survey each year. There’s just so much stuff — the classes taken, videos and computers, everything.”

Not only does the state evaluation see if records are kept, but the audit ensures that the training complies with TCLEOSE and other requirements; that each officer has met all continuing education and training requirements; checks for curriculum for courses offered  and lesson plans, evaluation and records for each; looks at required quarterly reports and the minutes that have to be kept for a training advisory board, which has to meet certain requirements, be apprised of law and regulation changes, as well as program changes; and have copies of past TCLEOSE training evaluations for five years.

Each department is evaluated on a yes-or-no, pass/fail standard on a check list that spans more than three pages.

“Everything on the check list has to be in order,” said Turner. “It was a lot to learn. This was my first time to do it.”

Turner this year took over the program following the resignation of the former training coordinator, Andy Chester, who accepted a position in another county. Turner has been to several instructor training and training coordinator conferences to make sure he was up-to-date on new and updated training areas. He’ll go in October to another week-long training coordinator’s conference.

He credits the department’s good marks on last week’s training records audit largely to the former coordinator, Andy Chester.

“He could have left things in a shambles, but when I took it over there wasn’t a whole lot to overhaul – just go through an make sure everything is in compliance with the [training records] book [the department is required to maintain]. Andy left it in good shape,” Turner said of Chester.

 

Search...

WebSite

mySSnews Login



User Menu