LoginCreate an account

  Username: Password:
 
Home mySSlife Health Obesity among adults in US rises

Obesity among adults in US rises

E-mail Print PDF
User Rating: / 0
PoorBest 

WASHINGTON (AP), Obesity rates among adults rose in 23 U.S. states over the past year and did not decline anywhere, says a new report from the Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

And while the U.S. has long been bracing for a surge in the government-funded medical program for the elderly as the the generation born after World War II starts turning 65, the new report makes clear that fat, not just age, will fuel much of those bills. In every state, the rate of obesity is higher among 55- to 64-year-olds ‚ the oldest boomers ‚ than among today's 65-and-beyond.

That translates into a coming jump of obese elderly patients that ranges from 5.2 percent in New York to a high of 16.3 percent in Alabama, the report concluded. In Alabama, nearly 39 percent of the oldest boomers are obese.

Health economists once made the harsh financial calculation that the obese would save money by dying sooner, notes Jeff Levi, executive director of the Trust, a nonprofit public health group. But more recent research instead suggests they live nearly as long but are much sicker for longer, requiring such costly interventions as knee replacements and diabetes care and dialysis. Studies show Medicare, as the program for the elderly is known, spends anywhere from $1,400 to $6,000 more annually on health care for an obese senior than for the non-obese.

"There isn't a magic bullet. We don't have a pill for it," said Levi, whose group is pushing for health reform legislation to include community-level programs that help people make healthier choices ‚ like building sidewalks so people can walk their neighborhoods instead of drive and providing healthier school lunches.

"It's not going to be solved in the doctor's office but in the community, where we change norms," Levi said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has long said that nearly a third of Americans are obese. The Trust report uses somewhat more conservative CDC surveys for a closer state-by-state look.
___
On the Net:
Trust for America's Health: http://healthyamericans.org/
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation: http://www.rwjf.org/

Copyright 2009 The Associated Press.

 
Sanjay Gupta MD (video)
Finally, straight answers about your health.
  • I want candy!
    For Halloween, CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta and CNN Eatocracy's Kat Kinsman talk candy nostalgia and the worst candy available.
  • Brother doctors freed from Iran, reunite
    Sanjay Gupta interviews two brothers, both doctors, who were imprisoned in Iran while treating HIV/AIDS patients.
  • The next killer virus
    CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta talks with virologist Nathan Wolfe about finding infectious diseases before they spread too far.
FOX News
FOXNews.com - Breaking news and video. Latest Current News: U.S., World, Entertainment, Health, Business, Technology, Politics, Sports.
FOX News
  • Why we weigh slightly less on Fridays
    For most of us, weekends are a time to relax and indulge—maybe through more sleep, more couch time, or more calories in the food and beverages we consume.
  • Dr. Manny: What we stand to lose in Ferguson riots
    On Monday, authorities braced for the worst but hoped for the best ahead of the announcement that a grand jury did not indict a Ferguson, Mo., police officer who shot and killed an unarmed black teenager in August. The shooting touched off weeks-long nationwide protests, and authorities were met with resistance from demonstrators and unruly crowds as they tried to respond to emergencies. 
  • Doctor behind 'free radical' aging theory dies
    Dr. Denham Harman, a renowned scientist who developed the most widely accepted theory on aging that's now used to study cancer, Alzheimer's disease and other illnesses, has died in Nebraska at age 98.
  • More depression among female execs
    Alyson Breathed remembers working such long hours as a hotel marketing manager that sometimes, her evening nanny had to bring Breathed's two children to work.
  • Why female executives get depressed more than men
    Alyson Breathed remembers working such long hours as a hotel marketing manager that sometimes, her evening nanny had to bring Breathed's two children to work.
  • Lung cancer battle: Time for action
    Lung cancer kills nearly twice as many women as breast cancer, but there is no sea of ribbons, no colored NFL cleats, no national monuments aglow in pink for lung cancer awareness.

Search...

WebSite

mySSnews Login



User Menu