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Home mySSlife Health Build a Legacy of Caring: Your gifts contribute to a future of quality health care

Build a Legacy of Caring: Your gifts contribute to a future of quality health care

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For the last five years, the Hopkins County Health Care Foundation has held a winter gala and Lights of Life campaign, raising a total of $504,660, including more than $150,000 from the record-setting 2009-2010 campaign. Those funds have helped the hospital add digital mammography equipment, a children’s therapy garden and a healing garden to its offerings for the community.

The gala will continue, helping to fund priority projects for the hospital each year. In addition, Jackie Thornton, Foundation director at Memorial Hospital, says that as she and the Foundation board look forward to the next five years they want to encourage people to donate to the Foundation in other ways. “The Foundation is about more than just giving great parties,” she says. “It’s about establishing an endowment legacy that can live on in Hopkins County so quality health care can continue for generations to come.”

She encourages people in the community to consider contributing to the Foundation, just as you may contribute to your church. “Building a strong long-term endowment will help secure advanced health care for future generations. Donations to the Foundation provide a meaningful, lasting way to honor special persons or pay tribute to deceased friends or loved ones. All contributions—large and small—are greatly appreciated,” she says.

Thornton hopes to see the endowment grow through bequests, trusts, annuities, annual cash donations and appreciated assets. Some gifts may even offer immediate tax benefits to the donor, as well as reduce estate taxes. “The generosity of the community through their support of the Lights of Life campaign and gala over the past five years allows us to launch into the next five years of establishing a strong longterm endowment,” she adds.

Discover How to Give

For more information on the Hopkins County Health Care Foundation, please call 903-438-4799.

 
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